Recent Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution Articles

Metrics This study focuses on reconstructing the time-calibrated phylogeny of the nine families comprising the order Sapindales, representing a diverse and economically important group of eudicots including citrus, mahogany, tree-of-heaven, cashew, mango, pistachio, frankincense, myrrh, lychee, rambutan, maple, and buckeye. We sampled three molecular markers, plastid genes rbcL and atpB, and the trnL-trnLF spacer region, and covered one-third of the generic diversity of Sapindales. All three markers produced congruent phylogenies using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods for a set of taxa that included outgroups, i. All results confirmed the current delimitation of the families within Sapindales, and the monophyly of the order. Concerning inter-familial relationships, Biebersteiniaceae and Nitrariaceae formed a basal grade or sister clade to the rest of Sapindales with moderate support. The sister relationship of Kirkiaceae to Anacardiaceae and Burseraceae was strongly supported.

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The position of the root of the Salmonidae phylogenetic tree was uncertain. Among the possible variants, the most reasonable seems to be that in which thymallins are grouped into the same clade as coregonins and the lineage of salmonins occupied a basal position relative to this clade. The genera of Salmoninae formed two distinct clades, i.

Introduction CA: Philosophy and Theology. CA Ethics. CA Evolution is the foundation of an immoral worldview. CA Crime rates etc. have increased since evolution began to be taught.

No unambiguous relationships between thymalllins, coregonins, and salmonins it was possible to establish. It seems likely, that divergence of these lineages took place during rather short time interval about 3 to 4 million years. The thymallins are thought to be the first separated lineage. The genera of the subfamily Salmoninae form two distinct monophyletic groups, represented by 1 Brachymystax and Hucho and 2 Salmo, Parahucho, Salvelinus, Parasalmo and Oncorhynchus.

Ancestral forms of these two evolutionary lineages could diverge at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary about 24 million years ago. It is suggested that diversification of the main lineages within the second group was rather rapid, and took place in middle Miocene about 19—16 million years ago. Moreover, the lineages of Salvelinus, Parasalmo and Oncorhynchus were the latest to diverge.

Principles and Practice of

Molecular phylogeny uses such data to build a Systematics and Systsmatics. AN In recent years, most systematics studies have focused on phylogenetic analyses of molecular data sets. AN In recent years, most systematics studies have focused on phylogenetic phylogenetic systematics and molecular dating of molecular data sets. Molecular phylogenetics phylogenetic systematics and molecular dating m provides a molecular clock for dating divergence. Spring The aim of the course is to teach Ph.

Phylogenetic systematics and molecular dating For comparative phylogenetic systematics and molecular dating, the same moleculag was used phlogenetic all dating analyses Fig.

Some of the most renowned evidence for evolution are the various nonfunctional or rudimentary vestigial characters, both anatomical and molecular, that are found throughout biology. A vestige is defined, independently of evolutionary theory, as a reduced and rudimentary structure compared to the same complex structure in other organisms.

Editor, Creation magazine Probably the most well known case of atavism is found in the whales. According to the standard phylogenetic tree, whales are known to be the descendants of terrestrial mammals that had hindlimbs. Thus, we expect the possibility that rare mutant whales might occasionally develop atavistic hindlimbs. In fact, there are many cases where whales have been found with rudimentary atavistic hindlimbs in the wild see Figure 2.

Hindlimbs have been found in baleen whales Sleptsov , humpback whales Andrews and in many specimens of sperm whales Abel ; Berzin , p. Most of these examples are of whales with femurs, tibia, and fibulae; however, some even include feet with complete digits. For example, Figure 2. These bones are the remnants of one of two symmetrical hind-limbs found protruding from the ventral side of a female humpback whale, captured by a whaling ship from the Kyuquot Station near the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in July Two officials of the Consolidated Whaling Company were understandably impressed by this discovery, and they removed one of the legs and presented the skeletal remains to the Provincial Museum in Victoria, B.

The other leg was evidently taken as a “souvenir” by crew members of the whaling ship.

Cladistics

We begin our study of phylogenetics with this introduction to the history of the methods employed. Systematic Biology 50 4: The Theory and Practice of Phylogenetic Systematics. Homology This lecture deals with the first steps of phylogenetic analysis: Foreword, Chapter 1 A very good source for those of you who might want to continue with phylogenetics after the course: A Primer of Phylogenetic Procedures.

Cladistics (/ k l ə ˈ d ɪ s t ɪ k s /, from Greek κλάδος, cládos, “branch”) is an approach to biological classification in which organisms are categorized in groups (“clades”) based on the most recent common esized relationships are typically based on shared derived characteristics (synapomorphies) that can be traced to the most recent common ancestor and are not.

The theoretical frameworks for molecular systematics were laid in the s in the works of Emile Zuckerkandl , Emanuel Margoliash , Linus Pauling , and Walter M. Sibley birds , Herbert C. Dessauer herpetology , and Morris Goodman primates , followed by Allan C. Wilson , Robert K. Selander , and John C. Avise who studied various groups. Work with protein electrophoresis began around

Molecular phylogenetics

Genetic analysis to estimate the timing of diverging evolution… Tracks the was traits and species have evolved through time, h… A diagram that displays the lines of evolutionary history of d… Genome that undergoes biparental inheritance, fast rate of mut… molecular dating Genetic analysis to estimate the timing of diverging evolution… phylogenetics Tracks the was traits and species have evolved through time, h… 6 terms Lecture Evolutionary Lineages and Phylogenetics Define phylogenetic systematics Use of mtDNA in phylogeography Statistical phylogeography Philosophy and methods for the reconstruction of ancestor-desc… Summary of the shared biogeographic history of multiple taxa i… 1.

Selectively neutral varia… The framing of phylogeographic investigations within a rigorou… Define phylogenetic systematics Philosophy and methods for the reconstruction of ancestor-desc… Consensus Area Cladogram Summary of the shared biogeographic history of multiple taxa i… 6 terms Lecture Selectively neutral varia… The framing of phylogeographic investigations within a rigorou… Define phylogenetic systematics Philosophy and methods for the reconstruction of ancestor-desc… Consensus Area Cladogram Summary of the shared biogeographic history of multiple taxa i… 12 terms Phylogenetic Trees and Evolutionary Advances in Plants and Animals Cladogram.

The following, inevitably incomplete, introductory glossary of terms and concepts links to other topics discussed elsewhere on this site, as well as including general topics of interest such as well-known prehistoric animals.

A phenotypic characteristic, acquired during growth and development, that is not genetically based and therefore cannot be passed on to the next generation for example, the large muscles of a weightlifter. Any heritable characteristic of an organism that improves its ability to survive and reproduce in its environment. Also used to describe the process of genetic change within a population, as influenced by natural selection.

A graph of the average fitness of a population in relation to the frequencies of genotypes in it. Peaks on the landscape correspond to genotypic frequencies at which the average fitness is high, valleys to genotypic frequencies at which the average fitness is low. Also called a fitness surface. A behavior has adaptive logic if it tends to increase the number of offspring that an individual contributes to the next and following generations.

If such a behavior is even partly genetically determined, it will tend to become widespread in the population. Then, even if circumstances change such that it no longer provides any survival or reproductive advantage, the behavior will still tend to be exhibited — unless it becomes positively disadvantageous in the new environment. The diversification, over evolutionary time, of a species or group of species into several different species or subspecies that are typically adapted to different ecological niches for example, Darwin’s finches.

The term can also be applied to larger groups of organisms, as in “the adaptive radiation of mammals. A mode of coping with competition or environmental conditions on an evolutionary time scale. Species adapt when succeeding generations emphasize beneficial characteristics.

International Journal of Plant Sciences

Patterns of nucleotide substitution and indel frequency in different categories of primate taxonomy. C Mean number of synapomorphic and autapomorphic indels per branch and standard error computed from Table 1 , Table 2 , Table 3 , and Tables S6 , S7 , S8. Horizontal lines reflect global mean for primate phylogeny for each parameter. Noted for extensive adaptive evolution, the relative hierarchical branching patterns of the four Lemuriformes families Indriidae, Lepilemuridae, Lemuridae, Cheirogaleidae recognized by taxonomists, has proven difficult to resolve conclusively.

A clade (from Ancient Greek: κλάδος, klados, “branch”), also known as monophyletic group, is a group of organisms that consists of a common ancestor and all its lineal descendants, and represents a single “branch” on the “tree of life”.. The common ancestor may be an individual, a population, a species (extinct or extant), and so on right up to a kingdom and further.

Molecules and evolutionary history. Paleontological Society Papers, volume 3. This publication by the Paleontological Society aims at providing high school teachers with readable reviews of a variety of topics related to evolutionary history. You might suspect that paleontologists spend most of their time studying fossils. While fossils are an important source of information for the paleontologist, other types of evidence can also tell us about biological history.

For instance, the rocks themselves provide important information, especially about past climates. It makes perfect sense that organisms are more easily understood if you know the environment in which they lived. A third important source of information is all around us. The organisms alive today are the current products of the various processes of evolution that have been at work for more than three billion years.

Organisms carry the legacy of their histories with them, in their anatomy, behavior, and genes. By studying and comparing living organisms, we learn about the past. Advances in technology have made the abundant historical information contained in biological molecules, chiefly genes and their RNA and protein products, easier to obtain. Many different things can be learned about the history of life from molecules.

Palaeos: Main Glossary

The Systematics and Biodiversity Science SBS cluster supports research that advances understanding of the diversity, systematics, and evolutionary history of extant or extinct organisms in natural systems. This research addresses fundamental questions in biodiversity, taxonomy, and phylogenetics, such as: What kinds of organisms exist or existed? How are they related? How can phylogenetic history shed light on evolutionary patterns and processes in nature?

The SBS cluster seeks to fund projects that are transformative – that is, those that innovatively and fundamentally transform our approaches to analyzing and understanding global biodiversity, its origins, distribution, and evolutionary history.

acquired trait: A phenotypic characteristic, acquired during growth and development, that is not genetically based and therefore cannot be passed on to the next generation (for example, the large.

Box , Wellington, New Zealand e-mail: Box , Wellington, New Zealand patb tepapa. Abstract The Gleicheniaceae are an ancient family of ferns, with three of the six extant genera occurring in New Zealand: Dicranopteris, Gleichenia, and Sticherus. The biogeographic origins of this family in New Zealand are unknown, and the taxonomy of Gleichenia in particular is still unclear. To address aspects of these two issues, DNA sequences from the trnL-trnF locus and the rbcL gene were produced for all of the common Gleicheniaceae species in New Zealand, as well as for Gleichenia alpina from Tasmania and Sticherus cryptocarpus from Chile.

Molecular Systematics Laboratory – An introduction from Alec Coles


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